Morsárlon

Walking to the glacial lagoon that lies at the base of the spectacular two-tiered Morsárjökull, you enter almost immediately into one of the most desolate landscapes imaginable – black sand plains. Even as someone who grew up in Canada’s prairies, it is almost unbelievable that something created by nature can be THIS flat. After crossing a branch of the Morsá (river), the hiking trail sticks to the shoreline, where dense clumps of dwarf birch trees provide a lush habitat for birds and other creatures. The walk to the lagoon and back is over 20 kilometres, but can be covered quite quickly, as there is very little elevation gain.

If you are a big spender, you can hire a bicycle from one of the guide companies near the parking lot ($25 for four hours per person, or $50 for the whole day) and ride to the second river crossing
If you are a big spender, you can hire a bicycle from one of the guide companies near the parking lot ($25 for four hours per person, or $50 for the whole day) and ride to the second river crossing
Black sand plains, looking due West
Black sand plains, looking due West
Utilitarian bridge crossing the Morsá
Utilitarian bridge crossing the Morsá
Looking up towards the summit of Kristínartindar, the mountain I climbed yesterday
Looking up towards the summit of Kristínartindar, the mountain I climbed yesterday
Signpost explaining the rock avalanche that coated the tongue of the glacier in 2007
Signpost explaining the rock avalanche that coated the tongue of the glacier in 2007
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