Squaw’s Tit

That name will get your attention. For the record, I would be in favour of renaming this peak for numerous reasons, but it is what it is. The final summit block is what captivated me, as it looks so impossible to surmount from the valley floor. I started out at 9am, and immediately compared notes with another party of two in the parking lot. I decided that I would follow a series of trails (Meander to Ridge Traverse, then the Tidbits Quarry trail) and pick up a drainage on the mountain’s north side. Upon arriving in the drainage, I was reluctant to follow it too far, for fear of not being able to scale the canyon-like walls and attain the ridge. I opted for an hour long bushwhack instead. I eventually picked up a path a while after crossing the Montane Traverse, and it lead to the ridge. The scrambling along this ridge was fantastic, at times more involved and exposed than Alan Kane’s ‘moderate’ rating suggests, in my opinion. On the descent, I followed the well-defined path to its end, at the drainage north of the mountain! A cairn marks the point where the path diverges from the canyon, for those of you who plan this undertaking in the future.

The route: right hand side was the ascent, left side the descent
The route: right hand side was the ascent, left side the descent
The entry from Alan Kane's Scrambles in the Canadian Rockies
The entry from Alan Kane’s Scrambles in the Canadian Rockies
A distant view of the mountain from the Ridge Traverse Trail
A distant view of the mountain from the Ridge Traverse Trail
Loose scree is avoided by gaining the ridge as soon as possible
Loose scree is avoided by gaining the ridge as soon as possible
A fossil in the limestone
A fossil in the limestone
The angle of the lower ridge is quite tame, but the exposure is real on the north side
The angle of the lower ridge is quite tame, but the exposure is real on the north side
Near the summit 'nipple' the grade becomes more steep, and the scrambling more challenging
Near the summit ‘nipple’ the grade becomes more steep, and the scrambling more challenging
A summit panorama
A summit panorama (click to enlarge)
Looking down on the Bow Valley, and the Trans Canada Highway from the summit
Looking down on the Bow Valley, and the Trans Canada Highway from the summit
Descending into the upper drainage, one can see my reluctance to pursue this route as an ascent
Descending into the upper drainage, one can see my reluctance to pursue this route as an ascent
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